Nat Geo WILD @natgeowild avatarNat Geo WILD

Instagram photos and videos

Photo: @andy_mann // Almost no where else in the world can you find giant schools of scalloped hammerhead sharks anymore outside of what is known as the “Cocos Range”, an underwater mountain chain connecting Galapagos Island, Ecuador and Cocos Island, Costa Rica. Recently, along with a team of biologists from both countries and the support of @waittfoundation we studied the underwater system that connects the two national parks. Targeting hidden seamounts along the way we found large aggregations of these sharks using it as an underwater highway. Within 2 weeks both countries had signed an agreement to identify the importance of this migratory route and begin the process of protection. A multinational marine science collaboration for the win. // I invite fellow ocean lovers to join me @andy_mann to see and hear more about the WILD world of sharks.
.
.
.
Join Nat Geo WILD for a two week celebration of sharks! SharkFest starts tonight at 8/7c!


71   20,717  

Photo by @joelsartore |
This bonnethead shark was born at Shark Reef Aquarium along with 9 other pups. Though sharks are commonly feared— only one attack on humans by this species has ever been recorded, and they are generally considered to be harmless. This species can be found throughout the western Atlantic Ocean and eastern Pacific along continental shelves, coastal areas, coral reefs, and muddy and sandy bottoms. They can reach 5 feet in length yet only can weigh up to 20 pounds. Using the small, sharp teeth in the front of their jaw for grasping their prey, and flat, molariform teeth at the back to crush the hard shells-- they feed mainly on invertebrates like crabs, shrimp, crustaceans, bivalves, octopi, and small fish. During the winter, large schools migrate to warm latitudes and then to cooler areas during summer. Threats include being eaten by humans and also processed for fishmeal, though happily they are not listed as threatened or endangered. Shark Reef Aquarium is predator based, with a focus on sharks and educating the public on the importance of predators in the oceans. They have successfully bred hundreds of sharks, including bonnethead, sandbar, black tip reef, bamboo and zebra sharks— which have also moved to other facilities supporting conservation. Follow @joelsartore To see another photo of this amazing shark! #sharkawarenessday #nationalsharkawarenessday


102   29,199  

SOUND ON! | Hibiscus now weighs 305 grams (which is 26 more grams than yesterday!) and receives three feedings a day at 7 a.m., 12 p.m. and 4 p.m. of special flamingo chick formula made by the Columbus Zoo and Aquarium’s animal nutrition team and consists of eggs, healthy fats and added vitamins! The texture is similar to a milkshake. The chick loves to drink lots of water and is now eating crushed pellets. However, Hibiscus only enjoys eating the fresh pellets and not the ones that sit too long in the water and get mushy.
.
.
.
Join Nat Geo WILD and the @columbus_zoo and Aquarium as we document the early life of this newborn on Instagram, before the series premiere of Secrets of the Zoo, July 29th at 9/8c!
.
Video by Joy Kotheimer, Columbus Zoo and Aquarium


358   45,647  

🎥 @filipe_deandrade | Shark diving...in Fiji? Yes please. This was one of the most life-changing assignments I have been on for National Geographic. I teamed up with @barefoot_kuata and one of the worlds premiere shark photographers @thomasvignaudphotography (who’s shark shots appear here) to document bull sharks off the Yasawa Islands. Bull sharks can thrive in both salt and fresh water, but they typically leave the brackish water they’re born in to hunt and look for a mate in the sea. We found big and beautiful females, some over 8ft which you can see in this video. Bull sharks get their name because of their broad and stocky build which definitely grabs your attention underwater. I believe interactions like this are important because they challenge what we think we know about the natural world. I’ll admit I was scared to jump in the water but when I did, that fear gave way to admiration and excitement. Sharks are incredibly important animals because they keep the oceans balanced. Over 4 billion people a day depend on the oceans for their food source. So you could say, WE depend on sharks. Follow @filipe_deandrade for more wildlife adventures.


109   18,830  

📸photo by @alexbraczkowski
Ever seen a spotted hyena in a forest? This cute hyena was photographed in a forest gorge in Uganda called Kyambura and it is home to African lions, chimpanzees, leopards and elephants. Hyenas also cruise through it to hunt and get to the surrounding savannas. Spotted hyenas are adaptable and occupy many habitats including arid savannas, woodlands and forests. Follow @natgeowild big cat biologist and cameraman @alexbraczkowski for more awesome shots of African wildlife 🦁
.
.
.
.
.
#hyenas #wildlife #natgeowild #uganda #africanbeauty #wildlifeonearth #wildlife_seekers #forests #wilderness


119   44,489  

📸 @filipe_deandrade | Sharks. They strike an emotional chord in almost everyone. Love, fear, curiosity or hatred. In my opinion, they are the most culturally fascinating animals in our world. And they quite possibly best represent what’s happening to our oceans. I find it funny that people who almost know nothing about sharks can fear them and want them removed. But when you talk to people who study or work with sharks, there is nothing but passion, love and respect. Why is that? Could it be that almost everything you hear about sharks in popular culture is negative and misconstrued? Every summer there is a new shark horror film and the perpetuation of them being mindless man eaters. But if that is the case, why is there a sub-culture of people that deliberately seek them out and jump in to their world? I’m lucky in that I get to travel the world to film/photograph wild animals. But in all my travels and all my time spent pointing cameras at creatures, nothing compares to being in the water with sharks. They are intelligent, beautiful and important creatures. When I am in the water with them, it is the complete opposite of any anti-shark Hollywood movie and just two different species co-existing. Don’t get me wrong, they are powerful apex predators and capable of damage, but they dont look at me as food. They are smarter than that and unless I pretend I’m food, they are barely interested in me. I snapped this photo of a dusky shark on a recent dive with my buddy @gatorboys_chris who runs a safe and fun shark dive operation in Jupiter, Florida. We saw 5 different species of sharks in 1 day and it inspired me to declare the summer of ‘18 “Summer of the Sharks.” Lets re-wire how we think about these majestic creatures and celebrate their importance in nature rather than falsely condemning them. Save your money on this years shark-horror flick and go see them in their natural habitat. Trust me, you’ll be glad you did. Love y’all wildlife warriors. Follow @filipe_deandrade for more wildlife adventures.


176   33,163  

Photo by @joelsartore |
This cute little critter is an African gray climbing mouse, found in sub-Saharan Africa. Although small, this species plays a role in regulating invertebrate numbers, seed predation, nutrient cycling, and is an important prey species for predators.
Follow @joelsartore to see a close up of this adorable mouse and other amazing creatures!


203   35,164  

Photo 📸by @alexbraczkowski
A pride of tree-climbing lions feasts on a waterbuck carcass in Uganda's Queen Elizabeth National Park. After a tragic poisoning event in April where 11 of these animals were killed this is some good news for the area. These individuals are a new pride and consist of a lioness and seven cubs of different ages. This young male was inquisitive about the remote camera trap that film maker @alexbraczkowski set on the carcass. Catch these incredible lions on a new @natgeowild big cat week airing later this year!
.
.
.
.
.
#lions #goldenlight #cameratrap #inquisitive #cub #cute #african #ugandan #uganda #nationalpark #lions #bigcat #bigcatsforlife


89   35,534  

Photo by @joelsartore |
The Starlight bristlenose gets its name from the small white dots that appear all over its body, resembling stars in the night sky. These dots are helpful in illuminating them as they inhabit everywhere from deep, dark waters of rivers to shallow low oxygen floodplains throughout the Amazon river basin in South America. Males can be incredibly protective of their offspring, and a fight over territory can result in the ousting of the submissive fish from its cave and the victor will then swim inside and consume the other’s eggs. Some of these fish can ingest oxygen and utilize it through their highly vascularised stomachs. For close-up photos of this amazing fish follow @joelsartore


112   24,668  

You voted. We listened! Meet Hibiscus, the Caribbean flamingo at the @columbus_zoo! #SecretsoftheZoo


94   15,347  

Video by @joelsartore |
Happy Fourth of July from the bald eagle, national bird of the U.S. Though they're capable of capturing their own prey, they also scavenge many meals. They eat mainly fish, but also hunt mammals, gulls, and waterfowl. Bald eagles usually do not breed until four or five years of age and may mate for life. Both males and females work to construct the huge stick nests they live in, which are often reused and enlarged year after year. Eggs are incubated by both parents for 34 to 36 days. This species is a conservation and environmental protection success story, seeing an increasing population over the last 40 years in North America. In the late 19th century and first two thirds of the 20th century, the population seriously declined over most of their range. With the population in serious danger of disappearing, the bald eagle was one of the first species to receive protections under the precursor to the Endangered Species Act in 1967, the species was later delisted when deemed stable in 2007. This protection and the efforts that followed, along with the banning of the insecticide DDT in 1973 (which impairs normal egg development in birds of prey), are all responsible for today's more plentiful populations.
For more videos like this follow @joelsartore


174   28,288  

Video by @alexbraczkowski
Look at the size of this bull elephant! I filmed him and about 20 other bulls at the @zakouma_national_park 🐘in Chad! For an hour @stevewinterphoto, @warren_smart and I got to film these giants from just a few meters away. They gather at the park wardens house everyday where they get water at a waterhole. On this day the temperature was about 110 degrees and the elephants were each trying to get a mouthful of water. @africanparksnetwork took charge of this park just over 10 years ago and elephant poaching has been virtually eradicated. The elephants have even started to breed again.
.
.
.
.
.
#african #elephant #elephantlove #cameraman #natgeowild #natgeo #beauty #wilderness #wildplace #africanparks #savetheelephants


257   34,045