RIE Collective @rie_collective

Rise of Indigenous Era
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Entering the month of December, our Native American Indian Heritage Month mission to make a post of one Native American artist per day has been completed. BUT a 30-day month was definitely not even close** to long enough a period to cover numerous creative, inspiring and influential Native American artists out there, both of the past and the present.
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One of our key goals going forward is to work with as many current Indigenous artists as possible to show the world that Indigenous values are powerful, vibrant, and impactful. Because everyday is Indigenous people's day, and every one of us should be Indigenous to somewhere-- it is a matter of whether we retrieve the root within us and what we decide to do with it.
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#rie #riecollective #riseofindigenousera #indigenous #areyouindigenous #native #nativeamerican #americanindian

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#NAIHMArtist30 Emmi Whitehorse
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"My work is about and has always been about land, about being aware of our surroundings and appreciating the beauty of nature. I am concerned that we are no longer aware of those. The calm and beauty that is in my work I hope serves as a reminder of what is underfoot, of the exchange we make with nature. Light, space and color are the axis around which my work evolves. The act of making art must stay true to a harmonious balance of beauty, nature, humanity, and the whole universe. This is in accordance with Navajo philosophy."
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"My paintings tell the story of knowing land over time— of being completely, microcosmically within a place. I am defining a particular space, describing a particular place. They are purposely meditative and meant to be seen slowly. The intricate language of symbols refers to specific plants, people, and experiences."
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Photos are from crystalbridges.org, telluridegallery.com, chiaroscurosantafe.com, and santafenewmexican.com. Quotes are from her artist bio and chiaroscurosantafe.com.
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#EmmiWhitehorse #artist #painter #Navajo #Indigenousmodernism #nativeamerican #rie #riecollective #nativeamericanindianheritagemonth

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#NAIHMArtist29 Allan Houser (1914 - 1994)
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"I work with clay and pull it around and see what I can do with experimental forms. When I'm creating something, I'm there with the clay, and after a while something begins to build. One of the good things is creating something that you've never seen before."
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"What I'm trying to do, is to make the Indian image look more contemporary and beautiful."
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Photos are from santafenewmexican.com and allanhouser.com. Quotes are from allanhouser.com.
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#AllanHouser #artist #sculptor #Apache #Indigenousmodernism #NativeAmerican #rie #riecollective #nativeamericanindianheritagemonth

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#NAIHMauthor28 Mourning Dove (1884 - 1936)
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"There are two things I am most grateful for in my life. The first is that I was born a descendant of the genuine Americans, the Indians; the second, that my birth happened in the year 1888. In that year the Indians of my tribe, the Colvile (Swy-ayl-puh), were well into the cycle of history involving their readjustment in living conditions. They were in a pathetic state of turmoil caused by trying to learn how to till the soil for a living, which was being done on a very small and crude scale. It was no easy matter for members of this aboriginal stock, accustomed to making a different livelihood (by the bow and arrow), to handle the plow and sow seed for food. Yet I was born long enough ago to have known people who lived in the ancient way before everything started to change.

Children were encouraged to develop strict discipline and a high regard for sharing. When a girl picked her first berries and dug her first roots, they were given away to an elder so she would share her future success. When a child carried water for the home, an elder would give compliments, pretending to taste meat in water carried by a boy or berries in that of a girl. The child was encouraged not to be lazy and to grow straight like a sapling.

Everything on the earth has a purpose, every disease an herb to cure it, and every person a mission. This is the Indian theory of existence"
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Photos are from greatthoughtstreasury.com, nebraskapress.unl.edu, amazon.com, abebooks.com, and barnesandnoble.com. The quote is from greatthoughtstreasury.com.
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#MourningDove #ChristineQuintasket author #writer #Okanogan #Colvile #Syilx #Salish #Indigenousmodernism #rie #riecollective #nativeamericanindianheritagemonth

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#NAIHMauthor27 Leslie Marmon Silko
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"The earth is your mother,
she holds you. The sky is your father,
he protects you. Sleep,
sleep. Rainbow is your sister,
she loves you. The winds are your brothers,
they sing to you. Sleep,
sleep. We are together always
We are together always
There never was a time
when this
was not so." [Storyteller]
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“Distances and days existed in themselves then; they all had a story. They were not barriers. If a person wanted to get to the moon, there is a way; it all depended on whether you knew the directions… on whether you knew the story of how others before you had gone. He had believed in the stories for a long time, until the teachers at Indian school taught him not to believe in that kind of "nonsense". But they had been wrong.” [Ceremony]
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"So this type of education [oral tradition] was exclusively based upon oral traditions and not on a written culture, as in McLuhan's terms.

Yes, it is a culture in which each person has a contribution to make. The older you are the more valued you are but each person is valued. The oral tradition stays in the human brain and then it is a collective effort in the recollection. So when he is telling a story and she is telling a story and you are telling a story and one of us is listening and there is a slightly different version or a detail, then it is participatory when somebody politely says I remember it this way. It is a collective memory and depends upon the whole community. There is no single entity that controls information or dictates but this oral tradition is a constantly self-correcting process."
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Photos are from knau.org, penguinrandomhouse.com, simonandschuster.com, abebooks.com, and amazon.com. Quotes are from her books as indicated above, and her interview with altx.com.
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#LeslieMarmonSilko #author #writer #LagunaPueblo #Indigenousmodernism #rie #riecollective #nativeamericanindianheritagemonth

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#NAIHMartist26 Wendy Red Star
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"This country was founded on the eradication of Native people. We were also, paradoxically, used for tourism to promote the expansion of the West. Really what it all boils down to is humanity. I am always trying to show this in my work. We are human beings. For some reason, Native people are represented as eradicated, like in Edward Curtis’s The Vanishing Race (1904) project. It’s worked pretty well. I think people are surprised when they find a Native person because in the consciousness of America it’s like we don’t exist. We are these mythical creatures.

The conqueror has set up an image of what Native people are. I always think of John Trudell and how he talks about the whole concept of The Indian as fiction, made up when the white people came. It’s true. We’ve lost our individuality as different nations. We were stereotyped into one thing."
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[Q: Can you share how # ApsaalookeFeminist hashtag was born?] "I’ve been on Instagram for about three years now and it lends itself to my work, as much of what I do is photo-based. I like the democracy of anyone having a camera and being able to construct an image or story within their own truth. Within the infrastructure of the platform, I started to explore what makes an Apsaalooké woman. I created the hashtag #ApsaalookeFeminist to discuss and reveal some of the things historically and culturally unique and specific to Crow women. I almost think of it as “counting coups.” We had a chief called Plenty Coups. Coups is a French word meaning “to strike,” and a lot of the chiefs were tasked with things like “counting coups” on their journey to becoming chiefs. Whenever I’m given the opportunity to make work with a university or institution or in collaboration with my daughter, I think of it as a coup from Native women who are underrepresented. The hashtag documents these various coups."
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All photos are from the artist's page, wendyredstar.com. Quotes are from her interviews published on aperture.org and dailyserving.com.
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#WendyRedStar #artist #multimediaartist #Apsaalooke #Crow #Irish #Indigenousmodernism #rie #riecollective #nativeamericanindianheritagemonth

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NAIHMauthor25 Velma Wallis
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“They forget that we, too, have earned the right to live! So I say if we are going to die, my friend, let us die trying, not sitting.” [Two Old Women]
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"The two women sat old and small before the campfire with their chins held up proudly, disguising their shock. In their younger days they had seen very old people left behind, but they never expected such a fate. They stared ahead numbly as if they had not heard the chief condemn them to a certain death—to be left alone to fend for themselves in a land that understood only strength. Two weak old women stood no chance against such a rule. The news left them without words or action and no way to defend themselves." [Two Old Women]
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Photos are from andreareadsamerica.com and harpercollins.com and quotes are from her book [Two Old Women: An Alaska Legend of Betrayal, Courage and Survival].
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#VelmaWallis #author #writer #Gwich'in #Athabascan #Indigenousmodernism #rie #riecollective #nativeamericanindianheritagemonth

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NAIHMartist24 Shonto Begay
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"From a very young age, I found excitement in recreating facets of my universe in varying images. I was inspired and surrounded by Hozho (beauty), including the sounds of songs and healing chants accompanied with stories from elders. I survived boarding school partly because of my spiritual strength and retreat into my drawings. I was always drawing. "Arts Save Lives" is my mantra. "Shonto" in Dineh’ translates to sunlight on water—a reflection of light on the canyon wall from the flowing water. My journey as an artist is to document my life and the world as I see through the lens I was born with through my Navajo experience while negotiating the modern. I have worn many hats in my life: shepherd, BIA Boarding School inmate, cowboy, National Park Service Ranger, Wildfire crew, professional boxing team support, film actor, author and artist." .
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"I paint my dreams and things I know. When a Navajo child is born it's umbilical cord is cut, buried in the earth, to forever be embraced by the Mother. As long as I know where my cord is buried, I know I can go anywhere in the world and feel at home… as long as the umbilical cord is held, embraced by the earth, it is a magical thing."
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"The landscapes, I know. This is the land that tempered me. I grew up to the rhythm of the chants, the prayers, and to the rhythm of weaving. I like sharing that, I like sharing not only the beauty, but the angst, the darkness, and the tribulation. There is a lot of it out there and painting is the way I transcend the shadows."
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“I think that as an artist of this culture you really can't separate the two (spiritual beliefs and art/life). When you are creating something, it is a very spiritual undertaking. My grandmother always made that a point in later years. The broken circle, the broken cycle of brushstrokes is just like healing. There is a completion of centeredness, a completion of a chant being done."
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Photos are from modernwestfineart.com and medicinemangallery.com. Quotes are from his interviews published on medicinemangallery.com and questia.com.
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#ShontoBegay #artist #Navajo #Indigenousmodernism #riecollective #nativeamericanindianheritagemonth

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NAIHMartist23 James Luna (1950 - 2018)
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[Q: Why do you make yourself the subject of your art?] "Because I know myself better than I know anything else. How do you talk about things like intercultural identity. Do you talk about it in third person? If you sacrifice yourself, so to speak, then it becomes much more dynamic. I like to think that in my work I'm talking about something I know because I've lived it, as opposed to something that I read about.

I was looking at work that I hadn't been involved with. There was a gap there that I filled rather quickly when I looked around at myself, my family, my tribe, my community and my reservation. It was all there, I didn't have to go anywhere for subject matter. I've been at this 30 years and I have probably another—I don't know how many years—to be done because it's there, it just needs to be spoken to. That's a message for younger artists."
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[Re: performance art shown in photo 4]"Standing at a podium wearing an outfit, I announce: “Take a picture with a real Indian. Take a picture here, in Washington, D.C. on this beautiful Monday morning, on this holiday called Columbus Day. America loves to say ‘her Indians.’ America loves to see us dance for them. America likes our arts and crafts. America likes to name cars and trucks after our tribes. Take a picture with a real Indian. Take a picture here today, on this sunny day here in Washington, D.C.” And then I just stand there. Eventually, one person will pose with me. After that they just start lining up. I’ll do that for a while until I get mad enough or humiliated enough."
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Quotes are from smithsonianmag.com. Photos are from upi.com, researchgate.net, and nativeartsandcultures.org.
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#JamesLuna #artist #performanceartist #installationart #payomkawichum #Luiseno #Ipi #Mexicanamerican
#Indigenousmodernism #rie #riecollective #nativeamericanindianheritagemonth

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#NAIHMartist22 Edmonia Lewis (1844 - 1907)
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"There is nothing so beautiful as the free forest. To catch a fish when you are hungry, cut the boughs off a tree, make fire to roast it, and eat it in the open air, is the greatest of all luxuries. I would not stay a week pent up in cities, if it were not for my passion for Art."
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"I was practically driven to Rome in order to obtain the opportunities for art culture, and to find a social atmosphere where I was not constantly reminded of my color. The land of liberty had not room for a colored sculptor."
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"Sometimes the times were dark and the outlook was lonesome, but where there is a will, there is a way. I pitched in and dug at my work until now I am where I am. It was hard work though, but with color and sex against me, I have achieved success. That is what I tell my people whenever I meet them, that they must not be discouraged, but work ahead until the world is bound to respect them for what they have accomplished."
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Quotes are from edmonialewis.com and yearofwomenshistory.blogspot.com, Photos are from biography.com, americanart.si.edu, crystalbridges.org, sothebys.com, metmuseum.org, and clevelandart.org.
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#EdmoniaLewis #artist #sculptor #Ojibwe
#AfricanAmerican #Indigenousmodernism #rie #riecollective #nativeamericanindianheritagemonth

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#NAIHMAuthor21 Zitkala-Sa (1876 - 1938)
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"I cried aloud, shaking my head all the while until I felt the cold blades of the scissors against my neck, and heard them gnaw off one of my thick braids. Then I lost my spirit. Since the day I was taken from my mother I had suffered extreme indignities. People had stared at me. I had been tossed about in the air like a wooden puppet. And now my long hair was shingled like a coward's! In my anguish I moaned for my mother, but no one came to comfort me. Not a soul reasoned quietly with me, as my own mother used to do; for now I was only one of many little animals driven by a herder." [The School Days of an Indian Girl]
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"The "glassy blue eyes" of white men stared at the Indian children on their journey to Indiana; "the snow still covered the ground, and the trees were bare" when she arrived at the missionaries' boarding school; and she found Earlham College students to be "a cold race whose hearts were frozen hard with prejudice." [The School Days of an Indian Girl]
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"For untold ages the Indian race had not used family names. A new-born child was given a brand-new name. Blue-Star Woman was proud to write her name for which she would not be required to substitute another's upon her marriage, as is the custom of civilized peoples.” [American Indian Stores]
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"The voice of the Great Spirit is heard in the twittering of birds, the rippling of mighty waters, and the sweet breathing of flowers." [American Indian Stories]
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Quotes are from her books as indicated above. Photos are from americanhistory.si.edu, nebraskapress.unl.edu, abebooks.com, and worldcat.org.
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#Zitkalasa #author #writer #Lakota #Sioux #YanktonDakota #Indigenousmodernism #rie #riecollective #nativeamericanindianheritagemonth

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#NAIHMAuthor20 David Treuer
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"What I really love about language revitalization, what is so key to it, is that it's always been ours and it's a chance to define ourselves on and in our own terms and in ways that have nothing to do with what's been taken. We can define ourselves by virtue of what we've saved."
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[Re: "These languages lend themselves to memory" as written in "The Translation of Dr Apelles."] "Well, myths and ideas about Indian people often obscure the true dimensions of our lives, and that's very much the case for Dr. Apelles. He's kind of shy and not very stoic and a little pudgy and super-smart, but not very personable, and, um, lives in a city and works as a librarian of sorts at a very strange library. His life does not conform to any of the ideas that most people have about Indian lives. And part of the reason is that those ideas are ideas that people have, at least in the context of America in English.

So English is almost the language that we have for storytelling about Indians. It's almost his enemy, or it's certainly not helping him express his truest self. It's these other Native languages, which he both had as a child and acquired as someone studying linguistics, that he feels more comfortable in because he doesn't have to do combat in those languages with the trove of notions and icons and images and ideas that attend Indians in English. In these native languages, he is unburdened of all of those things. And he is — he becomes sort of newly made in them, and it's easier for him to more accurately remember his past. Because the danger is for native people too and also for my character is that where it's likely to misconstrue ourselves perhaps in English."
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Quotes are from his book [The Translation of Dr. Apelles] and his interview on onbeing.org Photos are graywolfpress.org, groveatlantic.com, penguinrandomhouse.com, macmillan.com, and Abebooks.com.
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#David Treuer #author #writer #scholar #Ojibwe #LeechLake
#Indigenousmodernism #languagerevitalization #rie #riecollective
#NativeAmericanIndianHeritageMonth

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