Stephen Alvarez

Journalist, artist, photographer for National Geographic Magazine. Most recently founder of the Ancient Art Archive @ancientartarchive

alvarezphotography.com/

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Stephen Alvarez

Morning in the Vienna Museum of Natural History. This morning I arrived early for a visit at the Museum of Natural History. I love being in a Museum before it opens while the staff is still working. The collections at the Museum are amazing but what impressed me most was the grandeur of the building itself and of course the Venus (Woman) of Willendorf. Head to the @ancientartarchive for a longer discussion of her. #Vienna


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Stephen Alvarez

Sunrise on the Rita Blanca National Grasslands |
I'm excited to announce a photography workshop at Chico Basin Ranch in Colorado May 19-24. Details Below

PHOTOGRAPHY WORKSHOP with Stephen Alvarez Ranchlands Camp, Chico Basin Ranch, Colorado May 19-24 
This spring 2019, Stephen will lead an immersive photography workshop at Chico Basin Ranch. Spend a week exploring photography, wildlife and the subtle landscape of the high prairie. The workshop will be a deep dive into ways of seeing the lifecycle of an 87,000 acre working ranch. Discover and hone your vision through tailored assignments, group and individual image reviews all while basking in the tranquility and hospitality of Chico Basin Ranch.
Cost: $2,995 pp includes all meals, activities, and private furnished tent. For details or to book contact stay@ranchlands.com


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Stephen Alvarez

Wheels up for Budapest this morning. I can't wait to get back to this beautiful, vibrant city!

#hungary #budapest


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Stephen Alvarez

@williamalbertallard i having a flash print sale. This is a fantastic chance to own a signed original by one of the masters of photography. Go to @williamalbertallardand CLICK LINK IN HIS PROFILE TO FOR MORE INFO*** Lancaster County, Pennsylvania 1964 
The portrait of the fragile but seemingly unafraid little girl seen alongside the heads of two enormous draft horses was published in the August, 1964 issue of National Geographic in my essay on the Amish of Lancaster County, Pennsylvania. The child was with her father who was working in his fields. At some point in the afternoon she was standing in the back of a farm wagon, the horses, unhitched, were about to be led to the barn and for a moment they provided the background for her profile. Her blouse appears worn, perhaps a bit dirty from childish play, and its pale blue color seems to echo the softness in the child's light complexion and whispy, blond hair.
Photographing the Amish was the beginning of my photographic depiction of several subcultures in my country and elsewhere during the 1960's. My essays on the Amish in 1964, the Basques of France and Spain in 1968, and the Hutterites of Montana in 1969, all dealt with the lives of people living in a culture all their own.
This flash sale print is a 6” x 9” image on a 9” x 11” paper. It is an archival ink jet print on archival watercolor paper. It is signed in graphite pencil on the front border. It is a perfect gift for a young aspiring photographer or for anyone who loves photography. At a price of only $100.00 it is a bargain not to pass up. All prints are shipped via USPS priority mail.***CLICK LINK IN PROFILE TO PURCHASE*** As part of my bi-annual flash sale, I am offering this signed print at $100 for a three week period beginning October 8th and ending on October 29th. 
Lancaster County, Pennsylvania 1964 
The portrait of the fragile but seemingly unafraid little girl seen alongside the heads of two enormous draft horses was published in the August, 1964 issue of National Geographic in my essay on the Amish of Lancaster County, Pennsylvania. The child was with her father who was working in his fields. At some point in the afternoon she was standing


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Stephen Alvarez

@williamalbertallard is one of the all time legends at National Geographic. His image have inspired me for decades. This month Bill is offering this image as part of a limited time print sale. Click the link in his profile (@williamalbertallard) for more info.
******
From Bill:

I am offering this signed 6” x 9” image on a 9” x 11” paper at $100 for a three week period beginning October 8th and ending on October 28th at 11:59 pm (EST). Lancaster County, Pennsylvania 1964

This gentle portrait of an Amish boy holding his pet guinea pig started my career as a professional photographer and my 50 years as a contributor to National Geographic Magazine.
In the spring of 1964, I was blessed with getting a photographic internship at National Geographic in Washington D.C. after showing my portfolio of work to Robert E. Gilka, the legendary director of photography at National Geographic. As my first assignment as an intern, Gilka sent me to Lancaster County, PA to cover a Pennsylvania Dutch festival. "Try to get some pictures of the Amish, if you can," he told me. It seemed the magazine had a finished manuscript about the Amish but had no pictures. He didn't tell he'd earlier sent a staff photographer to Pennsylvania who'd come back with nothing. Although I photographed the festival events my success with the Amish came through driving the country roads, introducing myself to Amish farmers, many of whom turned me down but eventually finding one who allowed me to photograph his family and their way of life. My first assignment which was to have been for a weekend or perhaps a week, lasted through much of the summer and into the fall of 1964. On an overcast afternoon, after photographing an Amish farmer working in his fields I was brought to the barn by his son so he could show me his pet guinea pig. My portrait of the boy and his pet became the lead picture in my essay on the Amish of Lancaster county published in the August, 1965 issue, a story which has been credited as the beginning of a new, more intimate look at people in the National Geographic Magazine.


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Stephen Alvarez

A followup to yesterday's post | James Alker makes his way into the cave behind Ora waterfall. The previous day James led a wet, sloppy traverse through the jungle covered cliff beside Ora Waterfall. Water pours from the entrance across a short ledge and then off the 50 meter cliff. To shoot this photo I had to rig a rope from a tree that grows over the waterfall and hang there suspended while James completed his climb. It was wonderful and terrifying all at once. #explore


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Stephen Alvarez

Ora River forms a massive waterfall as it pours from a cave entrance more than 50 meters up the side of the Nakanai Plateau In Papua New Guinea's remote island of New Britain. This image is from a National Geographic (@natgeo) sponsored expedition to explore the huge caves on the island of New Britain. 21st century exploration often means climbing up and into places like this. @natgeoimagecollection @thephotosociety


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Stephen Alvarez

Dr Jaime Awe swims into the Maya sacrifice cave Actun Tunichil Muknal. It is one of the most incredible places I have ever seen underground. The cave was used as a sacrificial center for the 8th century Maya of Belize. In the main chamber there are skeletons cemented into the floor by the natural calcite along with hundreds of Maya ceramics and stone tools. Human sacrifice was a large part of classic era Maya society and that is very evident in this cave. Since I first visited the cave shortly after its modern discovery there has been damage to some of the artifacts and remains in the cave. However, it is still possible to take a tour of the cave with a qualified guide. #belize


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Stephen Alvarez

Dreaming of my favorite dirt road today and a wonderful trip I took this spring for the @ancientartarchive through the back country of Southern Utah. #roadtrip


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Stephen Alvarez

This door protects the 30,000 year old engravings in the cave Pair-non-Pair in Aquitaine, France. Only the 3rd Paleolithic art cave to be discovered it still ranks among the oldest figurative artworks in Europe. The horse looking over its shoulder just amazes me. The story of the caves discovery is equally amazing. A cows leg got stuck in an obscure hole while grazing. The farmer discovered the cave trying to free his animal.


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Stephen Alvarez

Saint-Emilion, France |The Jurade of Saint-Emilion traces its history back to 1199. For centuries this group governed the town and surrounding lands. The red and ermine robes recall a time when this part of Southern France was governed by the English crown. Now the Jurade concerns itself with the distinct quality of the area’s wine. They guarantee the authenticity of the Saint-Emilion wines and set the date of the harvest. In this part of France wine is serious business. #Saint-Emilion #france


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Stephen Alvarez

If you ask a child to draw a castle they will inevitably draw something that looks like Chateau d'Agassac. On an early autumn evening it's a place from a fairy tale. #france


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